Two images of the same old photo side-by-side with one partially restored by online AI software and the original beside it for comparison

AI photo restoration

I have a black and white photo-booth snapshot of my grandparents taken in 1941 right after they got married. It’s torn, bent, water damaged, discolored, and the paper developed something like scales. I photographed it with my iPhone 13 and started photo editing it. It was going to be a long tedious process.

After reading your article, I followed your link and uploaded the image to the site. The software worked incredibly well. It even moved the torn chunk a little to try to realign it. Half the work is done and the detail in their eyes, nose, mouth and hair is probably not something I could have achieved.

There’s a lot of work left to do in Photoshop, but it’s a great start. Thanks for sharing this.

--

--

Thank you, Kim, for featuring my writing journey on your blog! I never even imagined an article like this from anyone. It’s really cool. My philosophy is to grow where I’m planted. Pebbles don’t complain about where they are dropped in the lake, they just go ahead and make a splash right there. My first email to my list was to eight subscribers. I love how you say it, “not disdaining the small size of his subscriber list.” That’s right. Each of those subscribers wanted to hear from me (presumably), so that’s where I started.

--

--

I have so many hard copy books! Most were purchased decades ago. If I had all the books in Apple Books and on my Kindle in hard copy format, it might challenge the integrity of the flooring system in my house. My parents parted ways with many books in a purge about 20 years ago. I hate that because there were some books in their collection that I wish I had today. Not that anyone else misses them, my mom still has a wall full of books.

--

--

Occultic October

An “objectification of evil” is a good way to put it, Nicola.

The sewage spill of occultic symbolism blithely broadcast by media and corporations from their clueless marketing goofs gets picked up by individuals in society and happily paraded as “fun” and amplified by social media. As if a celebration of death through noxious, occultic, human sacrifice rituals is somehow something that anyone should call fun. It’s not just absurd and ignorant, it’s intentionally inhumane and anti-Christian.

That’s the tip of the iceberg, too. TV and movie streaming and broadcasts scrape an endless barrell of new and left-over putrid content. Then, of course, the entire pop music industry is one big, chronic, oozing, occultic mass ritual 24/7. October is just an excuse to crank up the volume on their stupidness from 10 to 11.

Thanks for writing your post to speak out.

--

--

Travis Williams

In central Georgia from my desk at a window overlooking my back yard, I write Southern, science and historical fiction with Christian themes. booksbytravis.com